The Return of Artisan Products and What It Means for Your Business...{Brisbane Video Production}

  Matthew Evans from  The Gourmet Farmer . Image Credit:  www.sbs.com.au


Matthew Evans from The Gourmet Farmer. Image Credit: www.sbs.com.au

“Craftsmanship names an enduring, basic human impulse, the desire to do a job well for its own sake.” 

– Richard Sennett, The Craftsman


In my last post I talked about what customers really and truly want…meaningful connection. And that the current ‘slow living’ movement was indicative of what people crave in this modern, fast-paced world: to slow down; to savour each moment, and to be present to our feelings, thoughts, surroundings, experiences and most importantly, to our family and friends. To once again deeply value our relationships which bring us more purpose and joy to our lives.

I also offered some suggestions about how we as business owners can begin to create and give our customers more meaningful connection.

In the evolution of this shift, I’m witnessing a return to artisan products and businesses. And as customers we’re hopping on board the artisan train in droves. Why is that you may wonder?

I believe it’s all part of the return to what it is to be more human. To be more attuned to our senses. We have become so desensitised to our feelings and emotions, that we’ve lost the awareness, and hence our feeling of connectedness.

In talking about the return to artisan trades, it brings to mind an Australian documentary TV series on ABC that I love called ‘The Gourmet Farmer’. If you haven’t seen it, I would highly recommend it. The series is about a Melbourne chef turned food critic, Matthew Evans who leaves his job to become a farmer in Tasmania, raising pigs and sheep, milking cows and raising farm animals in a humane, eco-sustainable way, as well as growing produce, with the aim of  influencing and improving  the quality of the food that he, his family and the wider community eat. It becomes more about the journey and the process, rather than the end result. Though that still holds great significance.

We get to watch his progression and how through choosing a life of slow living, he creates a life (albeit challenging at times) that sees him grow as a person; his family grow and thrive, and how his deepening relationship with the animals, produce, and the land, better inform his way of life, creating deep relationships that take him on many adventures.

The series is a poster-boy for the slow living movement and the return of artisan businesses.

For many of us, that way of life which embues slow living, is what we dream of as a way of restoring the meaningful connection we’re longing for.
 

And in that whole artisan movement,  it’s about valuing the unique perspective, talents and abilities that an individual brings to the world. As customers and consumers, we are drawn to the uniqueness and the bespoke ways of the person we do business with…with someone who has taken the time to get to know his craft.

But more importantly, someone who has taken the time to get to know us and understand who we are and what is it about what he or she does that resonates with us. His process has allowed for that awareness. And we seek that out.


It’s this combination of wanting something truly unique, coupled with the human need and want for connection that our customers are wanting.

This week, if you get some time, why not catch an episode of ‘The Gourmet Farmer’ or Matthew Evans’ new series already released, ‘Fat Pig Farm’ where he opens a restaurant, celebrating home-cooked food that’s delivered from paddock to plate, all from his farm in Hobart.  So sit back and enjoy and savour the moments and while you’re watching, think about ways that you can create that sense of meaningful connection in your business.

Have a great week!


Much love...Kerry :) x