An Easy Way to Use Story in Your Videos...[Brisbane Video Training]

 Nikki practicing making videos during our DIY Video Workshop

Nikki practicing making videos during our DIY Video Workshop

"Sometimes reality is too complex. Stories give it form."

-Jean Luc Godard


I hope last week's post about how electrician Chris Moore, uses powerful stories to inspire his customers to action, helped you to see what stories are all around you that you can share in your business.

This week I wanted to share with you another real life example of how you can use story...but this time in your videos.

So I want to quickly introduce you to Nikki Ingram of Change Frame

Nikki is a small business owner and helps people who want to create or cope better with change in their life. She is also a past participant of my DIY Video Workshop that I held last year in November.  So I'm very excited and happy that Nikki has taken what she's learned, gone away and worked out a strategy as part of launching her business this year, and is now creating and using videos in her business. Recently she's been creating story-based video using CASE STUDIES.

Case Studies are just one way, and indeed a powerful way of using story to connect with your target audience and customers. The reason being is that case studies are based on real people (your customers) who have used your product and services and have received a happy, if not excellent outcome. As consumers, before we buy anything, we like to know that others not only have used our products and services, but that they have got the outcome they wanted.

In this video that Nikki has posted to her Facebook business page, she shares a story about her client Mary. Mary is re-entering the workforce after an extended period off and is looking at the next steps to get back into the workforce. 

 Click on the image to view Nikki's facebook video (you will need to be logged into Facebook)

Click on the image to view Nikki's facebook video (you will need to be logged into Facebook)

Let's give a quick breakdown of how Nikki has structured her video:

1. Intro 

Nikki gives us her name and business name (you could also add in a little about what you do or what your business is about that's unique).

2. Body  

Then Nikki let's us know what the video is about. She then gives us an overview of Mary's story, starting with why she went to Nikki for help, how she took Mary through the Change Frame Process and the outcome.

3. End

Nikki then finishes off with who she is and her business name, but most importantly, she tells her viewers what they can do and how to take action to get the same results using the Change Frame Process using a CALL-TO-ACTION.

Handy Tip:  When giving your audience a call-to-action, stick to ONE CALL-TO-ACTION so your audience doesn't get confused and it helps them take decisive action.

Lastly, Nikki has also used captions in her video. This is becoming more important for short videos as more people are watching videos without sound.

And to prove a point about the effectiveness of Nikki's video, here is a comment that one of her followers left after watching:

"Nikki your video is really informative. I initially wrote it is a great resource for younger women, but after checking out your website I’ve edited my comment because I think it is a great resource for anyone contemplating or facing change."  

How's that for validation?

So I hope that this has helped you with ideas around using story in your videos. Case Studies and Testimonial Videos are an easy type of video to create and are one of the most powerful ways you can connect with your audience because they are based on the real life stories of real people.

If you would like help with getting started with video and are serious about using video in your business, then book a Video Strategy Session with me today and we'll come up with ideas, strategies, tools and an actionable plan to get you started.

Until next week, have a great week and go out there are start playing and having fun with video!

Kerry :) x

*Image Credit: Photo by Hermes Rivera on Unsplash